WFDD Triad Arts 88.5

I can’t get that Nanci Griffith song out of my head. The one with the line, “Cause when you can’t find a friend, you still got the radio.” A great tune to hum on this dreary rainy day, listening to a story on WFDD Triad Arts about Postcards. Talking about it last week with the station’s assistant producer Bethany Chafin…

Won’t Back Down/Stay With Me

For all the grief Sam Smith’s been given over the song, and Petty’s grace about the damn thing, I think in the end, the two tunes go pretty well together. Alex McKinney and I take a spin on the song one Sunday night in late February at Beer Co. in downtown Greensboro. The evening with music is hosted by Alan Peterson, and with all the music, the potluck, and the company, it’s a great balm for the Sunday blues.

The Only Place You Can See It Live On the Radio, Gate City Port Authority

Pardon the “musician face” in this thumbnail image. It happens sometimes when I hit a wrong note.

Regardless, remember Avant On Air? That renegade music show on WUAG hosted by musician Matty Sheets and writer Rae Alton? The duo have recently launched  a second iteration of the radio program on Wednesdays night, this time, it’s got video.

Subscribe to the show’s YouTube channel and watch interviews, odd questions, and the general mayhem that ensues whenever Matty Sheets is in the room. Previous guests include Crystal Bright, Sam Frazier, and yours truly. It’s always good to see what Matty’s up to. It’s always something.

Gate City Port Authority

103.1 FM WUAG, Thursdays from 7-9pm. Local music and culture. Hosted by Matty Sheets and Rae Alton. Stream live at wuag.net or use the TuneIn app.

We’re happy to be partnering with Cameron Hetteen to bring you two video series here. Live In The Booth, featuring live performances from musicians from Greensboro and surrounding areas, and Transmission, featuring interviews with our guests.

Four new digital citizens stand in front of the lunch counter at the ICRC&M 55 years after four A&T students launched the 1906s sit in movement. Left to right: Alexis Anderson, April Parker, Irving Allen, and Kristen Jeffers. Photo by Stephen Charles.

#GreensboroNow

It’s “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot,” a gesture that’s brought a mix of respect and revolt since it first appeared at protests in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. And it’s just as clear a sign about where you stand on the issues facing black America today as it was for a black man or woman to sit at a lunch counter in 1960s. Only today there’s a museum rope around the lunch counter.

The International Civil Rights Museum preserves the lunch counter that launched a movement.

Letting Go of the Lunch Counter

“People are saying, ‘My vision is…,’” Lacy Ward says, leaving off the end of the sentence. “People have been disappointed that their vision has not been fulfilled by an institution. That doesn’t mean you give up on your vision.”

Exterior of the International Civil Rights Museum in downtown Greensboro. PHOTO CREDIT: ICRM

Fresh Eyes: Hard Cider, Hard Issues with Lacy Ward

If you could create a handbook on how to have a conversation from here, post-Ferguson, to strengthen the relationship between the community and the police, what would it look like? Where do you start? Here’s what he said.

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